Archive for the ‘News’ Category


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warehouseA happy, tired group of museum studies students pause to pose with Dr. Noll during their day of service. Pictured above with their professor: Tynan Shadle, Erika Allison, Maggie Brown, Corrinne Moore, Samantha Eldridge, Paul Johnston, Katherine Dooly, Chad Rogers, and Matthew Moyer.

Museum Studies Gives Back
May 2013

Near the end of the academic year, nine students in the Architecture and Historic Preservation course took part in a work day at the Architectural Salvage Warehouse in Jonesborough, TN. The salvage warehouse serves as a repository of architectural material that aids in the preservation of east Tennessee’s built environment. The students worked hard throughout the day assisting in the organization of doors, windows, and interior millwork. Students also fabricated storage racks for wood flooring and dividers for more than one hundred doors in the Warehouse’s inventory. The Warehouse is staffed by volunteers and the assistance of Tusculum students was a great benefit in their ongoing efforts.

Museums of Tusculum bring home awards
April 30, 2013

At the Tennessee Association of Museum’s annual conference, March 20-22, the Museums of Tusculum College received an Award of Commendation for the Civil War Ball, “Heritage and Hoopskirts” and an Award of Excellence for the exhibit “Scholars then Soldiers: Tusculum College and the American Civil War.”

At “Heritage and Hoopskirts,” the Doak House Museum partnered with the 1860s Living History and Dance Society to demonstrate dances of the period and taught the dances to the audience. Olde Towne Brass, a group of professional musicians who perform in the manner of early American and Civil War bands, provided the music for “Heritage and Hoopskirts.”

This event was a part of the 2012 Greene County History Week and was made possible by a grant from the Tennessee Arts Commission’s Arts Builds Communities program, which receives funds through the sales of specialty license plates.

The new “Scholars then Soldiers: Tusculum College and the American Civil War” exhibit at the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library received an Award of Excellence. The student-created exhibit features information about the 19 alumni who fought during the war and the effect that the Civil War had on Tusculum College, including the merger with Greeneville College that had most of its assets destroyed due to the conflicts.

The exhibit will be on display through the remainder of the Civil War Sesquicentennial in 2015. The awards committee was very impressed with the quality of work and the involvement of Museum Studies students in this exhibit.

Updates from the Museum Studies Program
April 2013

May will bring the graduation of a bumper crop of future museum professionals. Samantha Bolen, Amanda Clampitt, Clare McBeth, Tom Salinas, and Sandy Salmons will extend a white glove to receive their hard-earned diplomas in just a few weeks. The Museum Program and staff at the campus museums wish this fine group all the luck in the world, but we’re sad to see them go and would keep them a while longer if we could!

Those students with graduation still on their horizon are working hard in the Architecture and Historic Preservation course. As part of the course, students will be performing some service learning at the Architectural Salvage Warehouse in Jonesborough where they will help organize and inventory windows, doors, and various other building parts. The course is being highlighted by a field trip to Old Salem Museum in Winston-Salem.

Over the course of the year, Samantha Bolen, Claire McBeth, Emily Shipsey and Corrinne Moore have been working on a unique project that combines historic photographs of Tusculum College with contemporary views of the College. The thought provoking results highlight the dramatic changes that have happened to the campus (and its students) over time. The exhibit, Time Crunched: Shifting Space and Time at Tusculum College, will appear both online and in print media in the near future.

Historian and Technology
April 22, 2013

Simon Appleford, associate director for Humanities, Arts, and Sciences at the Clemson Cyberinstitute (Clemson University), will be delivering a presentation, “Historians and Technology” on Monday, April 29, at 3:45 p.m. in Garland Library, Room105.

Appleford, who is also an adjunct lecturer in history, will lead a discussion on innovative ways scholars are using technology to make history.

The event is presented by the Tusculum College Department of History and Museum Studies.

Welcome Back Students!
August 2012

The upcoming academic year promises to be a busy one for the Museum Studies Program. We are excited to welcome six Museum Studies students to Tusculum! The new students will be part of a record setting introductory course that will strain the capacity of the classroom at Old College-what a great problem to have!

In addition to the usual schedule of coursework, this year, students will take a new course entitled: Introduction to American Material Culture. The course will require students to use material objects in the telling of American history and introduce the principles of connoisseurship.

This year will also see the inauguration of a new Museum Studies Club. One of the chief purposes of the club is to provide service to local institutions and agencies. As such, the officers are already planning weekend service trips to the local museum community.

Planning has begun for the next exhibit project at The President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library. Students will begin fundraising efforts for a new exhibit that, among other things, explores how opinions on Johnson’s presidency have changed over time. Most contemporary textbook authors do not give a favorable impression of the Johnson administration, but this was not always the case. The new exhibit will explore how changes in American society are reflected in the scholarly treatment of Johnson’s presidency.

Students will also work on a temporary exhibit that features historical images of Tusculum College digitally combined with modern images of the same subject. The project will rely on the photographic collections at the museum and include not only the college’s distant past, but also the more recent decades within the memory of recent alumni.

2012/13 is shaping up to be a busy year - welcome back students!

Performance dates changed for ‘Midnight Mind of Edgar Allan Poe’ event to March 30-April 1

March 4th, 2011
The performance schedule for the “Midnight Mind of Edgar Allan Poe” has been changed to Wednesday, March 30, through Friday, April 1. “The Midnight Mind of Edgar Allan Poe” will bring some of the classics and lesser known works by the American literary giant to the stage in the Behan Arena Theatre in the lower level of the Annie Hogan Byrd Fine Arts Building (side entrance). All three performances will be at 7 p.m.

The program will feature dramatic readings of Poe’s works enhanced by music, movement and innovative theatrical techniques. A historical narrative will provide interesting details of Poe’s life and times.

Poe’s works have been in print since 1827, and the versatile writer’s output includes short stories, poetry, a novel, a textbook, a book of scientific theory and hundreds of essays and book reviews. He is widely acknowledged as the inventor of the modern detective story and as an innovator in the science fiction genre. While his reputation today is based primarily on tales of terror and his haunting lyric poetry found in such classics as “The Tell-Tale Heart,” “The Raven” and “The Fall of the House of Usher,” Poe made his living as a literary critic and theoretician.

The public’s imagination has also been captivated by the character of Poe himself. The legend of Poe, created primarily as a result of a biography written by one of his enemies to defame the author’s name, characterizes the writer as a morbid, mysterious figure lurking in the shadows. The true Poe was a complex man who endured many tragedies in his life while seeking success in the literary world and left one of his biggest mysteries in the nature of his death, which has prompted a score of theories over the years.

The Museums of Tusculum program to explore the works and life of one of America’s greatest writers has been funded through a grant from the Arts Builds Communities fund of the Tennessee Arts Commission administered through the Johnson City Area Arts Council.

Admission is $5 for the general public and $4 for senior citizens. Tickets will be sold at the door only. Area middle and high school students will be admitted free of charge as will Tusculum College students, faculty and staff.

For more information about the program, please call 423-636-8554 or e-mail lwalker@tusculum.edu. To learn more about the Museums of Tusculum College, follow them on Facebook and Twitter. 

Museums of Tusculum seeking volunteers 

February 16th, 2011

The Museums of Tusculum are seeking volunteers for a variety of activities, from leading tour groups to helping care and process historical documents in the archives.The museums, which include the Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library on the Tusculum College campus, are looking for individuals with an interest in history, those who enjoy working with people and others who are looking for a way to serve the community in a unique way.

A variety of opportunities for volunteers can be found at the two museums in several areas of operations. In the area of education and interpretation, the museums need people who are willing to speak to small groups to assist in leading tours of the Doak House and teach children about the Doak family, Tusculum history and life in the 19th century.

Reliable individuals interested in volunteering as a docent are needed to help staff the Doak House Museum on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. from May through August. Docents also need to be willing to speak to tour groups.

This summer, the Doak House will need volunteers to help with one or more of the three educational, fun camps the museum hosts. Helpers are needed to assist in preparing lessons and snacks and in supervising children.

At the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library, individuals with an interest in history and a curiosity about the “stuff” of history (documents, photos, books and other artifacts) are needed to help work in the Tusculum College Archives, caring for its rare and precious contents.

People who enjoy working outdoors are welcome to volunteer in the effort to maintain the beauty of the grounds of the two museums and the structural integrity of the Doak House and “Old College” building that houses the President Andrew Johnson Museum, both of which are pre-Civil War structures.

The two museums on campus are operated by the Department of Museum Program and Studies. The Doak House Museum is the 19th century home of the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, co-founder of Tusculum College, and hosts thousands of school children from the region for a variety of educational programs related to the 19th century as well as other community programs, such as the “Pickin’ at the Doaks” monthly traditional music programs.

The President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library houses a special collection of items relating to the 17th president, the college’s archives, special themed exhibits and volumes from the institution’s original library.

The two museums are also part of the National Historic District on the Tusculum College campus. Follow the museums on Facebook and Twitter to learn the latest news and upcoming events or visit its Web site at www.tusculum.edu/museums to learn more about the variety of programs offered at the museums. 

‘Midnight Mind of Edgar Allan Poe’ to bring classics, lesser known works of literary great to stage

February 18th, 2011

The Museums of Tusculum College invite the public to experience the “Midnight Mind of Edgar Allan Poe” next month at Tusculum College. “The Midnight Mind of Edgar Allan Poe” will bring some of the classics and lesser known works by the American literary giant to the stage March 17-19 in the Behan Arena Theatre in the lower level of the Annie Hogan Byrd Fine Arts Building (side entrance). Performances on Thursday, March 17, and March 18, will be at 7 p.m. with a 2 p.m. matinee Saturday, March 19.

Dramatic readings of Poe’s works will be enhanced through music, movement and innovative theatrical techniques. A historical narrative will provide interesting details of Poe’s life and times.

Poe’s works have been in print since 1827, and the versatile writer’s output includes short stories, poetry, a novel, a textbook, a book of scientific theory and hundreds of essays and book reviews. He is widely acknowledged as the inventor of the modern detective story and as an innovator in the science fiction genre. While his reputation today is based primarily on tales of terror and his haunting lyric poetry found in such classics as “The Tell-Tale Heart,” “The Raven” and “The Fall of the House of Usher,” Poe made his living as a literary critic and theoretician.

The public’s imagination has also been captivated by the character of Poe himself. The legend of Poe, created primarily as a result of a biography written by one of his enemies to defame the author’s name, characterizes the writer as a morbid, mysterious figure lurking in the shadows. The true Poe was a complex man who endured many tragedies in his life while seeking success in the literary world and left one of his biggest mysteries in the nature of his death, which has prompted a score of theories over the years.

The Museums of Tusculum program to explore the works and life of one of America’s greatest writers has been funded through a grant from the Arts Builds Communities fund of the Tennessee Arts Commission administered through the Johnson City Area Arts Council.

Admission is $5 for the general public and $4 for senior citizens. Tickets will be sold at the door only. Area middle and high school students will be admitted free of charge as will Tusculum College students, faculty and staff.

For more information about the program, please call 423-636-8554 or e-mail lwalker@tusculum.edu. To learn more about the Museums of Tusculum College, follow them on Facebook and Twitter. 

Northeast Tennessee Regional National History Day grows to include more than 100 students from seven schools

February 21st, 2011

Students from seven schools in Greene and Hawkins had the opportunity to show what they have learned about the past and take part in a Civil War re-enactment recruiting camp as part of Northeast Tennessee Regional History Day on Feb. 2 at Tusculum College. While the regional event has grown steadily, this year’s event saw a doubling in both in the number of students and schools represented with more than 120 students participating from seven schools in Greene County and one in Hawkins County. Schools represented included Baileyton Elementary School, Chuckey-Doak High School, Chuckey-Doak Middle School, Greeneville Middle School, McDonald Elementary School, Mosheim Middle School and Rogersville Middle School.

Students illustrated what they had learned about their selected topic through the creation of exhibits, documentaries, websites and plays. A part of the National History Day program, students created projects related to this year’s national theme for the program, “Debate and Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences” to meet the requirements of the national program.

The Regional National History Day event also gave the students the chance to learn about the Civil War in an interactive way. The students participated in a Civil War recruitment camp, conducted by re-enactors Mack Cothran, Wes Jester, Artie O’Neal and Lewis Whaley in an effort coordinated by local re-enactor Carlos Whaley. The new troops were then visited by President Abraham Lincoln (portrayed in first person by Chris Small of The Lincoln Project) for a review.

The Andrew Johnson Heritage Association funds the National History Day program in the region with support from the Tusculum College Department of Museum Studies. Volunteer George Collins is the regional coordinator for National History Day events. Darlene McCleish, National History Day resource coordinator, worked with the students and teachers at each of the school throughout the academic year to create their projects. McCleish’s position was created with funds from the Andrew Johnson Heritage Association and the Niswonger Foundation,

The top two places in each category advance to the East Tennessee District event to be held at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville on March 4.

Projects advancing to the district event are (by category):

Documentary: individual - first place, “The Monkey Trial” by Jonathan Nicholson, a student at Mosheim Middle School, and second place, “Time to Reform: Too Many Birthdays Spent in Foster Care” by Macie Heck of Mosheim; group - first place, “Revoking Honor, Purge of 1917″ by Meghan Lamb and Erica Reynolds of Mosheim, and second place, “Operation Eagle Claw” by Chace Carter and Alex Reed of Baileyton Elementary School.

Exhibits, individual: sixth grade - first place, “Highway to the World, A Highway Robbery” by Jada Hensley of Mosheim; second, “Lincoln-Douglas Debates” by Eric Roberts from Chuckey-Doak Middle School, and third place, “Building Tellico Dam: The Debate of the Snail Darter” by Mason Price of Chuckey-Doak Middle.

Seventh grade - first place, “President Johnson vs. Congress” by Sandi Inscore of Mosheim; second place, “Holocaust, Auschwitz Concentration Camp” by Dawson Russell of Baileyton, and third place, “Animal Rights: It’s Not Black and White” by Amee Hankins of Chuckey-Doak Middle.

Eighth grade - first place, “The Place Where They Cried” by Amelia Schroeder of Chuckey-Doak Middle; second place, “The Lincoln and Douglas Debates” by Taylor Cooper of Chuckey-Doak, and third place, “Japan’s Doomsday Weapon Against North America” by Christian Smallwood of Rogersville Middle School.

Exhibits, group: sixth grade - first place, “From Tennessee Divided to Bridge Burning at Pottertown” by Kristen Dixon and Emily Kirk of Chuckey-Doak Middle; second place, “Iran Hostage Crisis” by Caroline Beals and Reeve Han of Chuckey-Doak, and third place, “The Atomic Bomb by Sara Davis and Hayley Willet of Mosheim.

Seventh Grade - first place, “Cuban Missile Crisis by Corben Bernard and Billy Stevens of Baileyton; second place, “Debating the Tennessee Valley Authority Then and Now” by Justin McCravey and Maddux Southerland of Mosheim, and third place, “To Secede or Not to Secede” by Caleb Moon and Kori Smith of Chuckey-Doak Middle.

Eighth grade - first place, “Debate Over Women’s Suffrage” by Caitlin Gosnell, Kendra Quillen and Andrea Vasquez of Chuckey-Doak Middle; second place, “Debated Diplomacy: The Cuban Missile Crisis” by Erika Hammers and Devan Johnson of McDonald Elementary School, and third place, “Nine Soldiers” by Katie Hale and Makayla Lynch of Baileyton.

Performance - individual - first place, “Rebecca Nurse: A Dramatic View of the Debate Over the Trial of Rebecca Nurse” by Ariel Davis of Chuckey-Doak Middle, and second place, “The Debate of the Emancipation Proclamation” by Taylor Dean of Chuckey-Doak, and group, first place, “Revolution Birth of a Nation” by Daniel Beddingfield, Austin Fillers, Parker McCrary and Kelly Russ of Chuckey-Doak Middle, and second place, “Woman’s Rights” by Hana Aucterlonie, Brittany Everhart, Tyler Puffenbarger and Brodie West of Mosheim.

Web site - first place, “Woman’s Suffrage” by Alexis Gibson and Michaela Myers of Chuckey-Doak Middle; second place, “Segregation in Baseball” by Danè Adams and Kenny Ball, Chuckey Doak, and third place, “Camp David Accord” by Dylan Carter, Luke Keasling, Caitlyn Powers and Noah Wagner of Mosheim.

The middle school students compete in the junior level of the National History Day event. High school students compete in the senior level.

Advancing to the district competition to compete on the senior level is Matt Hensley, a student at Chuckey-Doak High School, which his exhibit, “3 - 2 -1 Wait a Minute.”

Hensley was also presented a special award for his use of primary sources in his project.

Also receiving this award for the best use of primary sources were the group that placed first in the group performance category - Daniel Beddingfield, Austin Fillers, Parker McCrary and Kelly Russ of Chuckey-Doak Middle.

A monetary award was presented to these students, sponsored by the Andrew Johnson Heritage Association.

Judges for the event included Debra Jo Boles from the Greene County School System, Amy Collins from East Tennessee State University, Jennifer Pierce from the National Park Service, retired teachers Carolyn Gregg and Lynn Hartman, volunteer Connie Whaley and from Tusculum College, Dollie Boyd, Joyce Doughty, Marilyn duBrisk, Eugenia Estes, Dr. Paul Fox, Davis Smith, Jean Stokes, Mark Stokes and Heather Tunnell. Doughty also serves as president of the Andrew Johnson Heritage Association.

Students placing in the top of the district competition will advance to the state competition to be held in Nashville on April 2.

Doak House Museum to host home school enrichment program March 2

January 19th, 2011
The Doak House Museum on the campus of Tusculum College will host a home school enrichment program on Wednesday, March 2. Home school students and teachers are invited to participate in the museum’s educational and fun program, Toys and Games of the 19th century.

Students will participate in engaging activities at four different stations and learn about the life and times of the Doak family children in the 1800s while playing with the toys they knew and loved such as Jacob’s ladder, hooey sticks, dolls, pick-up sticks, blocks, nine pins, tops, marbles and moon winders.

The program will begin at 10 a.m. Due to inclement weather and program cancellations in December, the museum is offering a discounted rate of $4 per child. One parent or chaperone per group will be admitted free of charge. Space is limited, so reservations are required. Please contact Dollie Boyd at 423.636.8554 or e-mail dboyd@tusculum.edu to make reservations.

The Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library are operated by the Department of Museum Program and Studies of Tusculum College. In addition to the museums, the department is responsible for the College Archives and offers one of the few undergraduate Museum Studies degree programs in the country. The two museums are also part of the National Historic District on the Tusculum College campus. Follow the museums on Facebook and Twitter to learn the latest news and upcoming events or visit its Web site at www.tusculum.edu/museums to learn more about the variety of programs offered at the museums.

“Pickin’ at the Doaks,” the traditional music jam session, will resume at the Doak House Museum on Friday, Jan. 28.

Traditional musicians and music lovers are invited to the jam session from 6-8:30 p.m. in the Academy building at the Doak House Museum on the Tusculum College campus.

Hot cocoa and coffee will be available as well as limited seating. Attendees are welcome to bring their own chairs.

The “Pickin’ at the Doaks” program began last summer and its growing popularity led to its continuation into the colder months. The program was originally intended to be only scheduled during warm weather and take place on the lawn of the Doak House. The music program takes place the last Friday of each month.

The Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library are operated by the Department of Museum Program and Studies of Tusculum College. In addition to the museums, the department is responsible for the College Archives and offers one of the few undergraduate Museum Studies degree programs in the country. The two museums are also part of the National Historic District on the Tusculum College campus. Follow the museums on Facebook and Twitter to learn the latest news and upcoming events or visit its Web site at www.tusculum.edu/museums to learn more about the variety of programs offered at the museums.

 Doak House Museum to host Christmas Open House on Saturday, Dec. 4

November 30th, 2010

Doak House Christmas Open HouseThe Doak House Museum will be open for a special Christmas event on Saturday, Dec. 4.

The museum will host a Christmas Open House from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with special activities for all ages. The museum is located on the Tusculum College campus at 690 Erwin Hwy.

For the open house, there will be games and toys for children and free tours on the hour of the home of the 19th century home of the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, a co-founder of Tusculum College. The home has been decorated for an early 1800s Christmas.

A storyteller will perform in the central hall of the Doak House at 1 p.m.

Discounts on a variety of items, including toys and Christmas decorations, will be available in the museum’s gift shop, located inside the Doak House.

For more information about the open house, contact the Doak House Museum at 423-636-8554 or lwalker@tusculum.edu.

The Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library are operated by the Department of Museum Program and Studies of Tusculum College. In addition to the museums, the department is responsible for the College Archives and offers one of the few undergraduate Museum Studies degree programs in the country. The two museums are also part of the National Historic District on the Tusculum College campus. Follow the museums of Facebook and Twitter to learn the latest news and upcoming events.

Students in educational program at Doak House Museum creating greeting cards to send to wounded soldiers

The “Storytelling and Gingerbread” educational program at the Doak House Museum is giving students an opportunity to touch the lives of wounded soldiers with one-of-a-kind greeting cards.

Through Dec. 9, students who participate in the educational program, designed for younger elementary school students, will be making greeting cards to express gratitude and brighten the day of a soldier who is recovering at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center or other military medical facilities.

The cards that the children are designing and making will be sent to the Red Cross “Holiday Mail for Heroes” program for distribution. In the Holiday Mail for Heroes program, Red Cross and Pitney Bowes partner to distribute greeting cards to those serving in the U.S. armed forces worldwide as well as the soldiers who are recuperating in military medical facilities.

“When I first heard about this Red Cross program, I couldn’t wait to participate,” says Dollie Boyd, interim director of the Museums at Tusculum College. “What a great way for kids to connect to our nation’s soldiers. The cards they create are absolutely precious and heartfelt.”

Making the cards helps the children also learn the importance and reward in giving a little something back at this special time of year.

The volunteers and staff of the museum will be collecting children’s cards now through Dec. 9 to send to the Red Cross. The deadline to submit cards to the program is Dec. 10. The cards will then be distributed to active duty military and veterans.

For more information about the Doak House and the Storytelling and Gingerbread program please contact Dollie Boyd at 423-636-8554 or by email dboyd@tusculum.edu.

The Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library are operated by the Department of Museum Program and Studies of Tusculum College. In addition to the museums, the department is responsible for the College Archives and offers one of the few undergraduate Museum Studies degree programs in the country. The two museums are also part of the National Historic District on the Tusculum College campus. Follow the museums of Facebook and Twitter to learn the latest news and upcoming events.

Sign up for our monthly e-newsletter for the most up-to-date information on activities at the Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library. You can also look us up at Facebook and Twitter.
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Doak House Museum to host Christmas Open House on Saturday, Dec. 4

November 30th, 2010

Doak House Christmas Open HouseThe Doak House Museum will be open for a special Christmas event on Saturday, Dec. 4.

The museum will host a Christmas Open House from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with special activities for all ages. The museum is located on the Tusculum College campus at 690 Erwin Hwy.

For the open house, there will be games and toys for children and free tours on the hour of the home of the 19th century home of the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, a co-founder of Tusculum College. The home has been decorated for an early 1800s Christmas.

A storyteller will perform in the central hall of the Doak House at 1 p.m.

Discounts on a variety of items, including toys and Christmas decorations, will be available in the museum’s gift shop, located inside the Doak House.

For more information about the open house, contact the Doak House Museum at 423-636-8554 or lwalker@tusculum.edu.

The Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library are operated by the Department of Museum Program and Studies of Tusculum College. In addition to the museums, the department is responsible for the College Archives and offers one of the few undergraduate Museum Studies degree programs in the country. The two museums are also part of the National Historic District on the Tusculum College campus. Follow the museums of Facebook and Twitter to learn the latest news and upcoming events.

Students in educational program at Doak House Museum creating greeting cards to send to wounded soldiers (No Comments)

The “Storytelling and Gingerbread” educational program at the Doak House Museum is giving students an opportunity to touch the lives of wounded soldiers with one-of-a-kind greeting cards.

Through Dec. 9, students who participate in the educational program, designed for younger elementary school students, will be making greeting cards to express gratitude and brighten the day of a soldier who is recovering at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center or other military medical facilities.

The cards that the children are designing and making will be sent to the Red Cross “Holiday Mail for Heroes” program for distribution. In the Holiday Mail for Heroes program, Red Cross and Pitney Bowes partner to distribute greeting cards to those serving in the U.S. armed forces worldwide as well as the soldiers who are recuperating in military medical facilities.

“When I first heard about this Red Cross program, I couldn’t wait to participate,” says Dollie Boyd, interim director of the Museums at Tusculum College. “What a great way for kids to connect to our nation’s soldiers. The cards they create are absolutely precious and heartfelt.”

Making the cards helps the children also learn the importance and reward in giving a little something back at this special time of year.

The volunteers and staff of the museum will be collecting children’s cards now through Dec. 9 to send to the Red Cross. The deadline to submit cards to the program is Dec. 10. The cards will then be distributed to active duty military and veterans.

For more information about the Doak House and the Storytelling and Gingerbread program please contact Dollie Boyd at 423-636-8554 or by email dboyd@tusculum.edu.

The Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library are operated by the Department of Museum Program and Studies of Tusculum College. In addition to the museums, the department is responsible for the College Archives and offers one of the few undergraduate Museum Studies degree programs in the country. The two museums are also part of the National Historic District on the Tusculum College campus. Follow the museums of Facebook and Twitter to learn the latest news and upcoming events.

Storytellers spin Br’er Rabbit yarns for students at the Doak House Museum (No Comments)

September 10th, 2010

storytellers_dhm1Nationally acclaimed storytellers and musicians Sparky and Rhonda Rucker from the International Storytelling Center tell a Br’er Rabbit tale to students from Doak Elementary School Thursday (Sept. 9) at the Doak House Museum on the Tusculum College campus. Doak students in kindergarten through third grade visited the Doak House Museum for the program by the Ruckers, who told not only the Br’er Rabbit stories but also stories about the Civil War and the Underground Railroad. The performance is the result of a partnership between the International Storytelling Center in Jonesborough and the Museums of Tusculum College. As part of the partnership, storytellers in the center’s Tellers in Residence program perform for local school children each year at either their school or at the Doak House Museum or President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library on the Tusculum College campus.

storytellers_dhm2


Museum Studies
P.O. Box 5026
Greeneville, TN 37743
(423) 636-7348
1-800-729-0256
E-mail: dboyd@tusculum.edu